Published on: 26 August 2021 in Industry

Directors Digest — Thursday 26 August

Reading time: 2 minutes and 24 seconds

Jack Thorne’s outstanding MacTaggart lecture calls out the industry’s failures on disability, the BBC announces major projects on inclusion and the environment, and casting and auditions come under the spotlight. 

Jack Thorne delivered an outstanding MacTaggart lecture at this year’s Edinburgh TV Festival, calling out the screen industries for completely failing people with disabilities — in front of and behind the camera. You can watch the speech in full here. Earlier this year, we hosted a round table of disabled directors who shared their experiences and practical advice. You can read what we learned here.

Following Jack Thorne’s MacTaggart lecture, Netflix and the BBC announced their plan to co-produce shows from disabled creatives. (Variety)

A new UK survey has shed light on racism in the casting and auditions process, Variety reports.

The BBC has unveiled a historic new environmental programming landmark, Broadcast reports.  

The Guardian interviewed acclaimed documentary-maker and Directors UK member Jeanie Finlay about her filmmaking process

Meanwhile, Little White Lies interviewed Nia DaCosta about the making of her forthcoming horror, Candyman

Broadcast magazine followed up one year on from major broadcaster commitments to improving diversity, and found that progress was slow

Sky Chief Zai Bennet said the recent Noel Clarke scandal exposed a cultural issue, which is now being redressed. (Variety

And finally, the Coalition for Change released their new Freelance Charter, which establishes a best practice for workign with freelancers across the industry. Directors UK fed into the development of the Charter, and announced our support.

Are you a member with an opinion on one of these stories? Is there an issue affecting directors that you think isn’t getting enough attention in the media? Why not write for us and make yourself heard — email communications@directors.uk.com with your article idea.

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