Published on: 19 November 2020 in Industry

Directors Digest — Thursday 19 November 2020

Reading time: 3 minutes and 2 seconds

This week new reports exposed the extreme working hours of freelancers in the TV and film industry, and the representation of climate issues on TV. Meanwhile, FERA published their General Assembly discussions on the future of European directing. 

There was also BIFA and Bafta Breakthrough success for members, and a glimpse behind the scenes of The Way Out from RTS-nominated director Suri Krishnamma.

Television

Directors UK members Abigail Dankwa, Rubika Shah and Jordan Hogg were all included in this year’s BAFTA Breakthrough cohort — congratulations to all those included this year! (BAFTA)

In a fascinating behind-the-scenes video, Directors UK member Suri Krishnamma shows the work that went into directing The Way Out for screen — for which Suri earned an RTS Craft and Design Award nomination. (Battersea Arts Centre)

Bafta albert have released Subtitles to Save the World 2 — an update on their original report exploring how little climate issues are portrayed on screen. Read and download the report here. (albert)

A new report from Share My Telly Job has laid bare the shockingly long hours kept by film and TV freelancers. (Broadcast)

Finally, Pat Younge has been appointed non-executive director of ITV studios. (Televisual)

Film

At the 2020 FERA General Assembly, directors across Europe gathered to discuss their craft, and you can watch some of the panels in full, including 40 Years of FERA: What Makes a European Filmmaker in 2020? (featuring Directors UK member James Hawes), and Doomsday or Rebirth? A Rebellious Take on European Film’s Future. (FERA)

The BIFA awards have released their longlist in the new talent categories — congratulations to Directors UK members Rubika Shah, Nick Rowland, Claire Oakley and Aneil Karia and all this year’s nominees for Best Debut Director! (BIFA)

Meanwhile, David Olusoga interviewed Steve McQueen on the making of his powerful Small Axe film sequence. (Sight & Sound)

And finally, Little White Lies look at the technicolour couple who changed the look of cinema. 

Are you a member with an opinion on one of these stories? Is there an issue affecting directors that you think isn’t getting enough attention in the media? Why not write for us and make yourself heard — email communications@directors.uk.com with your article idea.

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